Arizona Residents: Join Brenda this Wednesday Oct. 13 for a Free Digestive Health Lecture

Heartburn, constipation, weight gain and fatigue—even allergies, arthritis and high cholesterol. You may not realize it, but so many common health problems begin in the gut, where roughly 80 percent of your body’s natural defenses are found.

As part of her free lecture series on digestive health and nutrition, Brenda Watson will be appearing this month in Scottsdale, Arizona to talk about the link between a properly functioning digestive system and a healthy body—including how our increasingly toxic world is taking a serious toll on the state of our digestive health. Plus, you’ll learn more about the natural supplements that are essential for helping you look and feel your best every day. Don’t miss it!

Wednesday, October 13th
7:00-9:00 p.m.

Sunflower Farmers Market
4402 N. Miller Rd.
Scottsdale, AZ 85251


Probiotics and Prebiotics: What’s the Difference?

By now many of you have heard about the remarkable health benefits of probiotics. In fact, the good-for-you bacteria seem to be making headlines everywhere these days—especially as we head into another cold and flu season. And as awareness increases about just how good probiotics are for optimal digestion and immunity, there’s another “p” word you might be wondering about: prebiotics.

In technical terms, prebiotics are often defined as “non-digestible food ingredients” that promote the growth of healthy bacteria in the digestive tract. So what does that mean? Quite simply, prebiotics are a food source for probiotics. So as they travel through the digestive system, they nourish all those good bacteria along the way and help them grow and multiply. The result? More good bacteria in the gut, which means better digestion and a stronger natural defense system.

So where do prebiotics come from? Well, mostly from soluble fiber sources such as oats, legumes, flax and almonds—and that’s where the “non-digestible” part comes into play. Dietary fiber—including both soluble fiber and insoluble fiber—really just refers to the parts of plant foods that our bodies are unable to digest and absorb, which is why it’s sometimes called “roughage”. Because prebiotics are not digested, they remain in the digestive tract where they can do their job of feeding their probiotic partners.

In addition to obtaining prebiotics through the diet, nowadays many probiotic supplements will actually include prebiotics to help you get the benefit of this dynamic duo (i.e. probiotics and prebiotics). For example, you may see something called FOS on the label. Short for fructooligosaccharide, FOS is extracted from soluble fiber foods such as chicory root and will help to feed and stimulate the growth of beneficial probiotic bacteria such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli.

So there you have it! Two powerful “p” words that can go a long way toward better digestion and a stronger natural immune system—talk about a winning combination!

Prebiotic Food Sources:

  • Almonds
  • Asparagus
  • Bananas
  • Barley
  • Berries
  • Chicory Root
  • Flax
  • Garlic
  • Honey
  • Leeks
  • Legumes
  • Oats
  • Onions
  • Soybeans
  • Wheat
  • Whole Grains