Community Blog & Forums

TAG | Beneficial Bacteria

A recent NPR article helped shed some light on a fascinating new field of scientific inquiry, namely how important our microbe population is to keeping us healthy and alive. We are rapidly coming to understand that we cannot live with our microbes, the trillions of bacteria, fungi, and other microbes that live in and on our bodies.

These microbes live on our skin and in our guts. They live in our noses and in the mucus our body uses to protect itself. Scientists featured in the article report that our bodies are home to 10 times more microbial cells than bodily cells. Their numbers are so staggering that as much as 99% of the genes in (and on) our bodies are microbes’ genes and not our own. But it is a mistake to think of these microbes as foreign. They are as much a part of what makes us “us” as the color of our eyes and our genetic inheritance.

Me and My Microbiome
Scientists are calling your microbiome, which includes the critical balance of healthy bacteria in the gut, the 11th organ system because of its many functions. Your microbiome:

  • Supports healthy digestion and immunity from your center, your gut
  • Shapes the way your immune system handles invaders by “teaching” the body which microbes are healthy and which aren’t from birth
  • Contributes to how much fat you store and how much energy you have
  • Signals the brain to impact your mood and behavior

The NPR article went on to reveal that Americans are at a microbial disadvantage due to the inundation of antibiotics in our society. We are exposed to a smaller pool of microbes and so our microbiomes are less diverse. A diverse microbiome is a strong microbiome that may be able to handle health challenges more effectively.

Remembering that our microbiome is such a pervasive part of our health is key. Not all microbes are germs to be avoided at all costs, and you need healthy microbes such as beneficial bacteria to stay healthy.

Source: “Staying Healthy May Mean Learning to Love our Microbiomes” NPR blog, July 2013

Beneficial Bacteria, Critical Balance, Digestion, Fungi, Genetic Inheritance, Germs, Guts, Health Challenges, Healthy Immunity, immunity, Inundation, Microb, Microbe, microbes, Microbial Cells, Mucus, Noses, Npr, Organ System, Scientific Inquiry, Trillions Hide

Probiotics found in probiotic supplements, yogurt, and other fermented foods such as kimchi and sauerkraut, are microscopic helpers that impact us in a big way when it comes to our health.

A recent Yahoo article, “Probiotics: More Than Your Tummy’s BFF..,” called out some of the important advantages to maintaining a healthy balance of digestive bacteria—supported by probiotics. Your gut is filled with trillions of bacterial cells, and probiotics help boost the amount of healthy bacterial cells there. These healthy bacteria promote healthy gut balance as well as produce vitamins, help digest your food, promote your immune health, and help keep your bowel and digestive tract ticking along nicely.

Dysbiosis and Your Gut
An imbalance of healthy bacteria in the gut is known as dysbiosis, a condition you may not know you have until its uncomfortable signs crop up. The signs of dysbiosis include:

  • Gas, bloating, and flatulence, especially around meal time
  • Occasional and unexplained constipation or digestive upsets
  • Skin issues such as itchy, dry skin or breakouts
  • Poor nutrient absorption and irregular digestion
  • Yeast imbalance

Boosting your levels of healthy bacteria through probiotic intake supports an optimal balance of beneficial bacteria in your gut.

Did you know?
The lining of your gut (GALT) is often called your “second brain,” and the bacteria in it are as important as brain cells in keeping you healthy. The gut associated lymphatic tissue (GALT) is your primary line of defense in the digestive tract; it also produces 90 percent of the body’s feel-good neurotransmitter serotonin.

The GALT is also heavily reliant on the beneficial gut bacteria to do its job. These beneficial bacteria, which include probiotics, promote important immune cell function and help create a healthy gut barrier. So, keep your probiotic intake high, avoid unnecessary antibiotic use, and eat a whole-foods rich diet to feed your gut, and whole body, healthy!

Source: “Probiotics, More Than Your Tummy’s BFF…” Yahoo Shine, July 2013.

Antibiotic Use, Bacterial Cells, Beneficial Bacteria, Brain Cells, Digestive Bacteria, Digestive Tract, Digestive Upsets, flatulence, Gut Bacteria, Health Benefits, Immune Cell Function, Immune Health, Kimchi, Meal Time, Nutrient Absorption, Optimal Balance, Probiotic Supplements, Rich Diet, Sauerkraut, Yahoo Article, Yeast Imbalance Hide

Older posts >>

‡These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. The material on this page is for consumer informational and educational purposes only, under section 5 of DSHEA.

Disclaimer: Nothing in this website is intended as, or should be construed as, medical advice. Consumers should consult with their own health care practitioners for individual, medical recommendations. The information in this website concerns dietary supplements, over-the-counter products that are not drugs. Our dietary supplement products are not intended for use as a means to cure, treat, prevent, diagnose, or mitigate any disease or other medical or abnormal condition.

Copyright © , ReNew Life Formulas, Inc., leading provider of quality probiotic supplements.

To top