When is the Best Time to Take Enzymes?

clock_veggiesEven the healthiest eaters may experience occasional bloating or upset stomach after a meal, which is why many of us reach for digestive enzymes to support the digestive process and help break down the foods we eat more completely.‡ One of the questions we hear often at Renew Life is When is the best time to take enzymes? Here is what our team of experts had to say:

Aim to take enzymes before or with meals. It is best to take them before so they can get to the small intestine where the majority of digestion occurs. However, often people report forgetting to take their enzymes before meals, so don’t worry if you take them after.

Did You Know…?

  • Enzymes play an important role in every function in the human body. The protein-based substances are involved in digestion, breathing, kidney and liver function, reproduction, elimination, and more.
  • Enzymes help with nutrient absorption.‡ They help break down foods in the digestive tract by breaking apart the bonds that hold nutrients together—nutrients that will be absorbed so the body can use them for energy and other important functions.‡
  • Different types of enzymes work with different types of foods. Proteins, fats, and carbohydrates are the most basic foods the body breaks down and absorbs; the enzymes protease, lipase, and amylase are made by the body for this purpose.
  • Enzyme production decreases with age. As we age, our bodies produce less protease, lipase, and amylase, which means digestion of protein, fats, and carbohydrates can be impaired as we get older.
  • Plant-derived enzymes are effective over a broader pH range in the body. For this reason, a plant-based digestive enzyme supplement is often recommended to help break down a wide variety of foods—including proteins, fats, dairy, carbs, and sugars.‡

Kids benefit from enzymes too! Taken with meals, enzymes are great way to support digestive health and help little tummies break down a broad range of foods.‡

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Omega-3 EPA May Help with Depression, Inflammation

woman-holding-headRight now more than 120 million people worldwide suffer from some form of depression, and that number is growing every year. As scientists work to understand more about depressive disorders and their impact on human health, recent studies have uncovered a link between depression and high levels of inflammation in the body—a link that was the focus of a new joint study by Emory and Harvard Universities.

For the purpose of the study, researchers recruited more than 150 men and women previously diagnosed with major depressive disorder. Participants were measured for specific biomarkers indicating inflammation and grouped according to their inflammation levels (either high or low). Over the next eight weeks, they received one of the following on a daily basis: 1,060 mg of Omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 900 mg of Omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or a placebo.

When researchers assessed depression levels at the end of the study, they discovered that those in the high inflammation group who received the EPA saw significant improvement of their symptoms, indicating that the Omega-3 fatty acid commonly found in oily fish may be part of an effective treatment plan for people with both depression and high levels of inflammation.

A Word about Inflammation
Inflammation refers to a wide range of immune functions the body uses to protect itself against illness and disease. When you catch a cold, for example, inflammation levels become elevated as the immune system works to rid the body of this new “bad guy”. It may last a few days to a week, but then it stops; this is how a healthy immune system functions. However, when the immune system is out of balance, inflammation can persist and contribute to a host of chronic conditions, including—as recent evidence has shown—depressive disorders.

By exploring the link between inflammation and depression, scientists hope to find ways to promote healthy inflammation levels as well as support optimal physical and mental health.

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