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Change is good. Especially when it means families across the U.S. can breathe a little easier knowing that their government has taken a huge step in the right direction. This week New Jersey Senator Frank R. Lautenberg introduced the “Safe Chemicals Act of 2010” to help protect American families from the onslaught of industrial chemicals in use today—many of which have not been tested for safety.

Says Lautenberg in press release posted on his website, “America’s system for regulating industrial chemicals is broken. Parents are afraid because hundreds of untested chemicals are found in their children’s bodies. EPA does not have the tools to act on dangerous chemicals and the chemical industry has asked for stronger laws so that their customers are assured their products are safe. My ‘Safe Chemicals Act’ will breathe new life into a long-dead statute by empowering EPA to get tough on toxic chemicals.”

Read more about Senator Lautenberg’s Safe Chemicals Act, or read the full act here.

Want to help? Visit our friends at Environmental Working Group to see how your voice can help bring about change—and join the more than 85,000 concerned individuals who have already signed the petition to support EWG Action Fund’s Kid-Safe Chemicals Campaign.

Written by Renew Life

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  • Rihana

    Making industrial chemicals safer is something we can all get behind. If we want safer chemicals and a safer environment then we must use nonanimal methods of testing.

    Currently, many toxicity tests are based on experiments in animals and use methods that were developed as long ago as the 1930’s; they and are slow, inaccurate, open to uncertainty and manipulation, and do not adequately protect human health. These tests take anywhere from months to years, and tens of thousands to millions of dollars to perform. More importantly, the current testing paradigm has a poor record in predicting effects in humans and an even poorer record in leading to actual regulation of dangerous chemicals.

    The blueprint for development and implementation for nonanimal testing is the National Research Council report, “Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy in 2007.” This report calls for a shift away from the use of animals in toxicity testing. The report also concludes that human cell- and computer-based approaches are the best way to protect human health because they allow us to understand more quickly and accurately the varied effects that chemicals can have on different groups of people. They are also more affordable and more humane.

    These methods are ideal for assessing the real world scenarios such as mixtures of chemicals, which have proven problematic using animal-based test methods. And, they’re the only way we can assess all chemicals on the market.