3 Reasons to Welcome Eggs Back into Your Diet

veggies_w_eggsAfter years of getting a bad rap, it seems eggs are finally getting some of the positive press they deserve. Eggs are an excellent source of protein, along with beneficial amino acids, B vitamins, and healthy fats. But if that’s not enough, three recent studies may inspire you to add an omelet or two to your weekly menu—or to top that healthy salad with a little hard-boiled goodness.

  1. Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes
    Researchers in Finland recently found that eating eggs was associated with a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, possibly because eggs contain beneficial nutrients that play a role in healthy glucose metabolism. In a study involving more than 2,300 middle-aged men, those who ate approximately four eggs weekly had a 37% lower risk of type 2 diabetes than those who ate only one egg a week.
  2. Healthy Weight Management
    An Australian study recently recruited 140 overweight men and women to study the effects of eggs on healthy weight management. Participants were divided into two groups—those who ate fewer than two eggs per week and those who ate two eggs a day, six days a week. Both groups were encouraged to eat similar amounts of protein, but those in the high egg consumption group said they weren’t as hungry overall and reported feeling more satisfied after meals.
  3. Better Absorption of Key Nutrients
    A new Purdue University study determined that adding eggs to your salad may increase the absorption of the beneficial nutrients found in raw veggies. More than a dozen participants were asked to eat three different versions of a mixed-veggie salad: one with no eggs, one with one and a half eggs, and one with three eggs (each containing an even mixture of yolk and egg white). When eggs were added, researchers saw a notable improvement in the absorption of nutrients called carotenoids. Carotenoids—including beta-carotene and lycopene—are antioxidants and linked to better health and reduced inflammation.

No tags

SAD Truth: More than 60% of Calories from Highly Processed Foods

bag-of-chipsIn light of a new study from the University of North Carolina, the nickname given to the standard American diet—SAD—seems more fitting than ever. That’s because study author Jennifer Poti and her team determined that more than 60% of our total daily calories come from heavily processed foods loaded with unhealthy fats, sugar, and salt.

Researchers looked at grocery purchasing data from more than 157,000 American households, which included over 1 million different products. What they found was that the biggest chunk of calories came from highly processed foods such as pre-packaged meals, refined breads, chips, snacks, desserts, candy, and sugary drinks—all of which have been linked to inflammation, obesity, diabetes, and more.

These findings, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, point out that not all processed foods are bad, since pasteurized milk as well as frozen fruits and veggies undergo minimal processing, but that Americans clearly seem to prefer their highly processed foods—those defined as “multi-ingredient industrial mixtures that are no longer recognizable as their original plant or animal source.”

The bottom line is this: we are consuming nearly 1,000 calories a day from foods that barely even resemble real food, but it is never too late to make smarter choices. Experts suggest cooking more meals at home with simple, fresh ingredients such as poultry, seafood, and non-starchy veggies; swapping unhealthy snacks for low-sugar fruits, plain Greek yogurt, and nuts; and replacing sugary drinks and soda with purified water.

No tags