When is the Best Time to Take Enzymes?

clock_veggiesEven the healthiest eaters may experience occasional bloating or upset stomach after a meal, which is why many of us reach for digestive enzymes to support the digestive process and help break down the foods we eat more completely.‡ One of the questions we hear often at Renew Life is When is the best time to take enzymes? Here is what our team of experts had to say:

Aim to take enzymes before or with meals. It is best to take them before so they can get to the small intestine where the majority of digestion occurs. However, often people report forgetting to take their enzymes before meals, so don’t worry if you take them after.

Did You Know…?

  • Enzymes play an important role in every function in the human body. The protein-based substances are involved in digestion, breathing, kidney and liver function, reproduction, elimination, and more.
  • Enzymes help with nutrient absorption.‡ They help break down foods in the digestive tract by breaking apart the bonds that hold nutrients together—nutrients that will be absorbed so the body can use them for energy and other important functions.‡
  • Different types of enzymes work with different types of foods. Proteins, fats, and carbohydrates are the most basic foods the body breaks down and absorbs; the enzymes protease, lipase, and amylase are made by the body for this purpose.
  • Enzyme production decreases with age. As we age, our bodies produce less protease, lipase, and amylase, which means digestion of protein, fats, and carbohydrates can be impaired as we get older.
  • Plant-derived enzymes are effective over a broader pH range in the body. For this reason, a plant-based digestive enzyme supplement is often recommended to help break down a wide variety of foods—including proteins, fats, dairy, carbs, and sugars.‡

Kids benefit from enzymes too! Taken with meals, enzymes are great way to support digestive health and help little tummies break down a broad range of foods.‡

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Exercise for Your Health, But Cut Sugar to Fight Obesity

candyFor decades we’ve been told how important it is to exercise if we want to lose weight—but we may not be getting the whole story. While staying active plays an important role in disease prevention and overall health, it turns out it is not the main factor in the fight against obesity. That title is reserved for sugar, according to a new report.

The report, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, points out that sugar and carbohydrates are the biggest culprits contributing to the sharp rise in obesity among Americans and those in similarly developed countries—and that even vigorous exercise will not offset the consequences of a high-sugar diet.

To make their case, researchers called attention to the fact that while obesity rates have skyrocketed in the last 30 years, our physical activity levels have remained pretty much the same. In other words, we’re not doing anything drastically different, but we’re still getting heavier. What has changed, however, is our diet—mainly the overload of sugar-laden processed foods introduced in the last few decades. The excess sugar and carbs pose a bigger risk than alcohol, tobacco use, and a lack of exercise combined, says the report.

Study authors spotlight the need to do a better job of educating consumers about the dangers of a high-sugar diet and, if possible, eliminating the perception that we can eat whatever we want as long as we exercise enough. Once again, we are reminded that the quality of the calories we eat is just as important—if not more so—than the quantity.

The bottom line is this: the body does not need nearly as much sugar as it gets from the Standard American Diet. Still, Americans consume at least 37 teaspoons of sugar daily (including the hidden sugars from starchy carbohydrates), which studies show can alter the balance of healthy bacteria in the gut and actually cause us to hold on to excess weight. By breaking free of our sugar addiction, we may be able to turn the tables on obesity and move toward a healthier future.

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