New Studies Reveal the Truth about E-cigs

e-cigElectronic cigarette users seem to be everywhere you look these days—in restaurants, at sporting events, even beside you in the grocery store aisle. Yet, despite a growing number of studies pointing to the potential dangers of vaping, e-cigarette use continues to go unregulated by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Here are three new studies that may soon encourage the FDA to change its tune.

In 2014 More Teens Used E-cigs Over Tobacco
According to the government-sponsored Monitoring the Future survey, which looks at substance abuse among U.S. teenagers, 2014 marked the first year that e-cigarette use surpassed the use of regular cigarettes among 8th graders (8.7 percent vs. 4 percent), 10th graders (16.2 percent vs. 7.2 percent), and 12th graders (17.1 percent vs. 13.6) percent—prompting organizations like the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids to stress the need for regulation. Experts at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warn that nicotine use in any form is unsafe for children and teens and can affect healthy brain development.

E-cigarettes Harmful to Lung Health & Immune Function
In a recent study involving mice, researchers from the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at Johns Hopkins University determined that e-cig vapor triggered inflammation and caused damage to healthy lung tissue, making the mice more likely to develop respiratory infections. And, those that did develop an infection had a more difficult time recovering; some of the mice experienced significant weight loss and even death. Small amounts of free radicals, which can attack and damage healthy cells, were also noted.

Flavor Chemicals in E-cigs May Be Toxic
Similar to the Johns Hopkins study, researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York found that the inhalation of flavored liquids called “e-juices” (used to enhance the vaping experience) may cause significant damage to healthy lung tissue. The URMC study also involved mice and revealed that the vapors are especially toxic when applied directly to the heating element of the electronic cigarette. “We were the first to discover that ‘dripping’ of e-juices onto the heating element generates free radicals and oxidative stress that leads to lung damage,” said lead author Dr. Irfan Rahman.

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Processed Foods, Inflammation & Weight Gain: What’s the Connection?

icecreamAside from the added sugars and harmful trans fats, scientists from the Institute for Biomedical Services at Georgia State University have found yet another reason to avoid processed foods: common food additives called emulsifiers.

Emulsifiers are used to improve texture and shelf life in a variety of food products from ice cream to salad dressing, but results of a new study involving mice reveal a not-so-appetizing downside. In a nutshell, they may be changing our gut bacteria in a way that promotes inflammation—resulting in an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), metabolic syndrome and obesity.

For the study, some of the mice were given a human-equivalent dose of two common emulsifiers used in processed foods (polysorbate 80 and carboxymethylcellulsose), while the others were fed a placebo. Afterward, researchers noted significant changes in the gut bacteria of the mice who received the emulsifiers. The altered bacteria were able to penetrate the intestinal lining and activate certain proteins that trigger an inflammatory response in the body. The results ranged from mild intestinal inflammation to chronic colitis, weight gain and metabolic syndrome.

 

According to study authors, cases of IBD and metabolic syndrome have risen dramatically since around the 1950s—about the time processed foods became extremely popular. They believe dietary changes may be a key factor, pointing out that food interacts “intimately” with our unique gut bacterial colonies, and the addition of chemicals such as emulsifiers may be causing a rise in inflammatory diseases.

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