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One of the reasons you take a daily probiotic is to help with digestion, but what about those times when you experience occasional bloating or upset stomach after eating? Taking enzymes with your meals may help provide relief.‡

You may not realize it, but enzymes work differently than probiotics. They support the digestive process by working to break down the foods we eat more completely.‡ And, when it comes to choosing the most effective enzyme formula, there are three important rules to follow. What are they?

Watch this eye-opening video to find out!
The 3 Rules of Enzymes

The 3 Rules of Enzymes explains how to choose the right enzyme formula based on a handful of simple guidelines that are surprisingly easy to remember—including why you should always look at the total number and variety of enzymes, since different enzymes are need to digest different types of food.‡ You will also learn the difference between enzymes and probiotics, and how they complement each other to help you digest your foods more completely and help balance your digestive tract.‡ Be sure to check it out!

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donutsHave you checked the labels in your pantry lately? Chances are more than a few include high-fructose corn syrup (not to mention the fridge, where soda and sports drinks are among the biggest culprits). In 2015 it’s time to say enough is enough, especially since yet another study has revealed the hidden dangers of HFCS.

Using mice, researchers from the University of Utah recently examined the effects of a diet high in HFCS—and the results may be a red flag for millions of Americans. According to lead author Wayne Potts, the fructose-glucose mix found in HFCS is significantly more toxic than sucrose (table sugar) and may pose a significant health risk. Unlike sucrose, HFCS is absorbed more quickly (due to the extra fructose), and the fructose travels directly to the liver where it contributes to a number of metabolic imbalances such as increased triglycerides and insulin resistance.

Potts and his team analyzed two groups of mice, each receiving one-quarter of their calories from either HFCS or sucrose—an amount similar to human consumption. Those in the HFCS group saw reduced reproduction (specifically 26.4% fewer offspring) as well as higher death rates among females.

“This is the most robust study showing there is a difference between high-fructose corn syrup and table sugar at human-relevant doses,” said Potts. The team points out the link between the introduction of HFCS into the American diet in the 1970s and the corresponding rise in obesity and diabetes. Their advice? Reduce added sugars in the diet and avoid products made with HFCS—an excellent health goal for the new year!

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‡These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. The material on this page is for consumer informational and educational purposes only, under section 5 of DSHEA.

Disclaimer: Nothing in this website is intended as, or should be construed as, medical advice. Consumers should consult with their own health care practitioners for individual, medical recommendations. The information in this website concerns dietary supplements, over-the-counter products that are not drugs. Our dietary supplement products are not intended for use as a means to cure, treat, prevent, diagnose, or mitigate any disease or other medical or abnormal condition.

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