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We know from past research that fish-derived Omega-3 fatty acids provide a multitude of health benefits for the whole body—from supporting the heart, brain and nervous system to protecting our eyes and joints. Now, three new studies spotlight the role of Omega-3 fish oil in a healthy diet and why we should consume more of these healthy fats and fewer saturated and trans fats.

Fish Oil May Protect Against Diabetes
Past evidence has shown that fatty fish consumption can help protect against diabetes by having a positive effect on glucose metabolism. In a recent study conducted by scientists in Sweden, similar results were seen in the case of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), which shares characteristics of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes including weight gain and insulin resistance. They found that one or more servings of fatty fish per week consumption was indeed associated with a reduced risk of LADA.

Omega-3 Fats Linked to Increased Brain Volume
Scientists no longer believe that age-related brain shrinkage and nerve cell death is irreversible. In fact, a recent study conducted by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh found that older adults who consume high amounts of Omega-3 fatty acids showed signs of new tissue development and an increase in gray matter—the areas of the brain involved in memory, emotions, muscle control, sensory perception and decision making.

Americans Still Eating Too Many Unhealthy Fats
Results of a new long-term study published last month in the Journal of the American Heart Association show that although consumption of saturated fats and trans fats have declined in the last three decades, Americans are still consuming far more unhealthy fats than experts recommend. The American Heart Association recommends limiting trans fats to one percent (or less) of total calories consumed and saturated fats to between five and six percent of total calories, while at the same time increasing the amount of healthy Omega-3 fats consumed from fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel and herring.

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As summer comes to an end, kids across the country are loading up their backpacks with fresh supplies and heading back to school—but new notebooks and No. 2 pencils aren’t the only things they need for a successful school year. Good nutritional habits go a long way toward giving kids a healthy head start. Here are five important tips for parents!

Bring Back Breakfast
A wholesome breakfast gives kids the fuel they need to start their day and stay energized, and studies show that children who eat breakfast perform better in school and are less likely to have behavioral problems. Avoid sugary cereals and heavily processed pre-packaged breakfast foods, and opt instead for fiber-rich steel-cut oats, fresh fruits that are low in sugar, and lean protein sources such as eggs, plain Greek yogurt, and turkey bacon or sausage.

Keep them Active
Kids may be more active during the summer months, but a new study from Illinois University suggests parents should make regular exercise a priority all year long. Researchers found that the brain scans of physically fit kids showed more white matter—indicating a greater capacity for learning, memory and paying attention in the classroom. Sports and after-school activities are a great way to encourage exercise, and parents can even arrange meet-ups at the park or ball field to help children get active after a long day spent sitting at their desks.

Be Smart about Brown Bagging It
With school cafeterias under pressure to provide better nutrition, many parents are opting to brown bag it. However, a new study out of Tufts University shows that packed-at-home lunches often include sugary drinks and processed snacks and not enough fiber, protein and healthy dairy products. Choose plenty of low-sugar fruits and non-starchy veggies, along with lean protein sources such as plain Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, and chicken or turkey slices. Other ideas include celery with low-sugar peanut butter, a handful of nuts, and baby carrots with hummus.

Make Sure They Get a Good Night’s Sleep
Research shows that children who don’t get enough sleep are more likely to have difficulty concentrating in the classroom. In addition, lack of sleep can contribute to mood swings, irritability and behavior problems during and after school. Most experts agree that school-age kids should get between 9 and 12 hours of sleep every night, so do your best to create (and stick to) a regular bedtime schedule to ensure they are getting a healthy amount of shut-eye.

Provide Essential Supplements
A healthy body begins with good digestion, so it’s important that children get the nutrients they need to digest their food properly and eliminate waste effectively and efficiently. Daily supplementation with fiber, probiotics and digestive enzymes can help kids get the nutritional support they need for a better digestion and overall health.‡ A daily probiotic supplement also promotes a healthy internal balance and can go a long way toward supporting healthy immune function during the school year, when children are exposed to daily challenges to their immune systems.‡

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‡These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. The material on this page is for consumer informational and educational purposes only, under section 5 of DSHEA.

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